I recently discovered that ESPN's Bill Simmons has a regularly updated links section of his own. Check out some of these gems:

ĽA New York Magazine feature about Gawker's growing influence in New York media.

ĽA video game about the black college football experience.

ĽA story about the city "glamorized" by The Wire.

ĽAnd this: Joe Buck is pitching a talk show in which he rides shotgun in a cab driven by his sidekick Abebe? Seriously? Abebe?

To combat YouTube, Viacom built a new site for The Daily Show that you're gonna love. Every minute of the show since 1999 is streaming there for free.

My boss Brian Lindamood would be pleased as punch if Mad Men ushered in a new style trend for men.

TV Guide's latest Ask Matt column has lots of good discussion of the new TV season so far.

Oooh, Radiohead tour tidbits. (Nothing too specific, but you might want to leave every night in 2008 open for now.)

Britpop SCANDAL! Travis admits stealing music from Oasis!

I'm linking to EW's story about Carrie Underwood just so I can post this remarkable photograph of her.

The MySpace page for the I'm Not There soundtrack has Bob Dylan covers by Cat Power, Sufjan Stevens, Jeff Tweedy and Jim James & Calexico.

Speaking of Sufjan, he is writing a 30-minute orchestral piece about the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway. Does that make him officially annoying?

Stylus has a couple hip-hop top 10s: most conflicted rap songs ever and top 10 songs with raps in the middle.

Idolator made up some fake band names and went around asking people at CMJ if they had heard of them. Hilarity ensued.

I haven't seen last night's The Office yet, but neither had Slate when they published this piece on why the show has suffered so far this season. This guy points out that none of NBC's best shows are pulling their weight just yet this year.

Plus: Another reaction to The New Yorker's story about the trouble with indie rock. Worth noting that Sasha Frere-Jones, the man responsible for the article, has been responding to reader reactions at his blog.

So this, from the mouth of creator David Chase, is what the ending of The Sopranos meant. Kind of lame that he cleared it up, in my opinion.

Finally, check out Metal That Sounds Like Other Metal (one of four in a series).