Illustration by Brendan Kiefer

Now that it's January, Pitchfork finally stopped ignoring all of Ohio's big fall indie releases, awarding the Black Swans' Change! a 7.9. Now if they would only acknowledge the existence of Southeast Engine and Psychedelic Horseshit...

Meanwhile, Dusted's Otis Hart runs down his top albums and singles, including a bunch I haven't heard but would love to.

Stereogum continues remembering 2007 with a list of its top 50 most downloaded MP3s of the year plus ZIP files of every song they posted for download all year. Nice work, lads.

Meanwhile, Wired reports on P2P's most traded songs, movies and TV shows on 2007.

Rumors are circulating that Jay-Z and Apple are teaming up to start a record label. Idolator rounds up the Web's reactions.

You may have heard that the RIAA is planning to go after music fans that have ripped copyrighted CDs into their computer (i.e. just about everyone with a CD and a computer). That Washington Post story isn't quite right, says Techdirt: The suits are only seeking technophiles who put their techno files in a shared music folder. So they're not getting you for ripping your music, just for then making it available for download. (Related: Will the RIAA die this year?)

More links after the jump.


Illustration by Brendan Kiefer

Now that it's January, Pitchfork finally stopped ignoring all of Ohio's big fall indie releases, awarding the Black Swans' Change! a 7.9. Now if they would only acknowledge the existence of Southeast Engine and Psychedelic Horseshit...

Meanwhile, Dusted's Otis Hart runs down his top albums and singles, including a bunch I haven't heard but would love to.

Stereogum continues remembering 2007 with a list of its top 50 most downloaded MP3s of the year plus ZIP files of every song they posted for download all year. Nice work, lads.

Meanwhile, Wired reports on P2P's most traded songs, movies and TV shows on 2007.

Rumors are circulating that Jay-Z and Apple are teaming up to start a record label. Idolator rounds up the Web's reactions.

You may have heard that the RIAA is planning to go after music fans that have ripped copyrighted CDs into their computer (i.e. just about everyone with a CD and a computer). That Washington Post story isn't quite right, says Techdirt: The suits are only seeking technophiles who put their techno files in a shared music folder. So they're not getting you for ripping your music, just for then making it available for download. (Related: Will the RIAA die this year?)

More links after the jump.

ABC has posted all episodes of Lost online in HD to get you ready for the show's January 31 return.

As their music critics did for 2007's best music, Slate's movie critics are posting an ongoing discussion of the year's best movies.

What's all this about a Kinks reunion?

Reuters reports on how easy it is becoming to "interpolate" Beatles songs into new hip-hop songs like Wu-Tang did with "While My Guitar Gently Weeps." (Even Ja Rule is doing it!)

Speaking of hip-hop: Rap feuds are so passe. These days it's all about R&B feuds!

New York Magazine explains why records leak.

And now for Kanye and Beyonce playing Connect Four.

Did Frasier kill the TV theme song?

The writers' strike has had at least one positive outcome: Conan and Dave had time to grow beards.

How is a 30-year-old dating an 18-year-old appropriate? Even if they are costars on Heroes?

Cool casting news for Spielberg's new flick: Sacha Baron Cohen as Abbie Hoffman.

You have to read AV Club's response to David Cross' defense of his Alvin cash grab.

Billboard lists "five TV shows to enrich the ears in 2008."

The Baltimore Sun's TV critic isn't happy with how his paper is portrayed in the new season of The Wire, which premieres Sunday on HBO. In his response, series creator David Simon emphasizes that the newsroom scenes are a fictionalized portrayal of real, pressing issues facing the journalism business. I've seen a few episodes and found the newsroom scenes to be quite relevant and well-done.

Speaking of The Wire, Suburbs continues its insightful commentary on the show with a look at Season 2's Ziggy Sobotka.

Let's finish with something called Human Tetris: