In response to Chris DeVille's excellent story about the state of the Columbus music scene ("Does the Rock Stop Here?"), I got a letter from an Alive reader who makes an interesting point: That music venues with no seating are a pain in the ass. Or, actually, they're a pain in the feet. (Check out the letter after the jump.)

Coincidentally, I suffered my own seat-free setback recently: I went to the Spoon show at the LC last month and bailed early after losing my patience with the standing situation. Not because my feet were paining -- the beer helped, and I was enjoying the music -- but because Spoon apparently attracts a devoted following of GIANTS.

At 6'0", I'm not short, and I rarely have problems seeing over others' heads at concerts or events. So it really was unusual for my view to be blocked from all angles by Spoon's oversized fans. I mean, there were a lot of tall guys there -- easily a dozen or more who stood at least 6'6". Was there some sort of lanky hipster convention in town? Or maybe it's genetic -- are beanpole boys just naturally drawn to dynamic Austin indie rock?

Whatever the case, I wish they could've taken a seat.

In response to Chris DeVille’s excellent story about the state of the Columbus music scene (“Does the Rock Stop Here?”), I got a letter from an Alive reader who makes an interesting point: That music venues with no seating are a pain in the ass. Or, actually, they’re a pain in the feet. (Check out the letter after the jump.)

Coincidentally, I suffered my own seat-free setback recently: I went to the Spoon show at the LC last month and bailed early after losing my patience with the standing situation. Not because my feet were paining -- the beer helped, and I was enjoying the music -- but because Spoon apparently attracts a devoted following of GIANTS.

At 6’0”, I’m not short, and I rarely have problems seeing over others’ heads at concerts or events. So it really was unusual for my view to be blocked from all angles by Spoon’s oversized fans. I mean, there were a lot of tall guys there -- easily a dozen or more who stood at least 6’6”. Was there some sort of lanky hipster convention in town? Or maybe it’s genetic -- are beanpole boys just naturally drawn to dynamic Austin indie rock?

Whatever the case, I wish they could’ve taken a seat.

Take A Seat: Letter from a local music lover

I enjoyed this article about the Columbus music market and whether or not it was considered strong or weak or in decline. I do think one important point is being overlooked here, though: There is no longer a smaller to midsize venue in this town with decent assigned seating and ticketing.

The shows I would most like to see nowadays -- say, The Bravery or Pete Yorn or even Garbage last year -- all go to either The Newport or Lifestyles Community Pavilion. These venues have no assigned seating and, in fact, you have to stand in line quite awhile before the show (at least this is true at the Newport). I have a bad back and can't just stand non-stop all those hours.

A good friend of mine went to a show at the Lifestyles and was shocked to discover he would have no seat. An hour or so in, back aching, he sneaked a seat in the roped-off and unused reserve area, which was not even an option at that particular show. He was quickly led back to the standing only area by security.

If, like me, you miss these shows, you can't even count on reading a review! The last time Pete Yorn was in town I searched Alive, The Columbus Dispatch and The Other Paper -- none had reviewed it and nobody even seemed to know why. This adds insult to injury. As for the larger shows, I was incensed when The Police passed us by on their recent tour. After all, Germain would have been available during their last season, also the new arenas at Nationwide and The Schott. When the tour was first announced I heard that Columbus dates would be added, but they never were. I called the local office of Germain, who feigned ignorance. I was referred to someone in California, but calls to that person were never returned. This was doubly insulting. The least they could have done was explain their reasoning. So it seems that, since I was in college in the 1980s, we have gone from a town with a number of venues, including Battelle Hall at the Ohio Center (which had assigned seating and acceptable acoustics) to the big two indoor arenas for extra big shows -- or, if it’s a smaller show, you are pretty much at the mercy of PromoWest and their venues with nonexistent seating.

If you want a mature music lover such as myself to actually attend local shows, they could try: a) Actually bring the show to Columbus at all. OR b) Create a venue with seating for up-and-coming acts. Because it’s starting to look like the bad old days to me, when acts just bypassed Columbus for Cleveland. We have all of these new arenas now, there really is no excuse for this. And a new one for the up and coming shows would sure be welcome about now! --CAB (local music lover)