Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} A little retail therapy for those saddened by the death of the "Where the Wild Things Are" illustrator and author.

What a bummer of a week for the creative world. First MCA dies. Now Maurice Sendak. Good night, sweet childhood.

Sendak, for those of you without social media accounts, was the author and illustrator of "Where The Wild Things Are" and hundreds of other children's books who passed away today.

Sendak's work was responsible for showing me and generations of other children (his most famous book came out in 1963) that darkness and loneliness and rage were a part of life, all of which could be quelled with a little imagination. What a strikingly relieving notion for kids awash in either a) pain and rage and/or b) overprotection. I mean, that's balls to write a kids book about chefs who "accidentally" bake a naked boy into their pie crust, right? Never again would I not appreciate a hot supper after reading "Where the Wild Things Are."

For some sob-worthy Sendak reflection, check out this "Fresh Air Remembers" post from NPR. Or, keep your eyes dry and check out these lovely products that pay homage to the writer of many a memorable line like, "Please don't go. We'll eat you up. We love you so."

The book itself, $10 hardback. LP Designs in the Short North recently became home to the former Bexley kid's book store Julia's Story. They've got hardback, paperback and audio of several Sendak stories available now.

"Let the Wild Rumpus Start" journal, $5.50

"Chicken Soup with Rice" illustration magnets, $7.50

Poster print, $5

T-shirts, varies