Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 One artist imagined what that might look like.

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Like every person still young enough to believe in them, I can enjoy a good happy ending; however, I can't get enough of cynical twists on fairytales, like these illustrations by artist Justin Turrentine on DeviantArt.com making the rounds online this week. They portray re-imagined endings to Disney movies. Endings in which the villains win. I think it's fair to glean a little schadenfreude from the baking of an overbearing, singing make-believe crab. Poor unfortunate souls.