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They call it the best-kept secret in Cleveland. If you're on two wheels, you'd call it paradise. Ray's Indoor Mountain Bike Park is a treasure trove of terrain just west of the city's downtown, offering endless lines, jump, log rides and whoop-de-dos for mountain bikers, BMXers and anyone in between.

Riders of all skill levels are welcome in the giant warehouse that grows exponentially by the year. Even if you're just learning to go off-road, there's a room for you.

Active seasonally, the park will be open Oct. 17-May 1. Admission costs $19 on weekdays, $22 on weekends. You can grab a season pass (not out of the question) for $299. They have quality rentals available, like the great single-speed 29er I used for the afternoon. You can also snag a smaller BMX model.

Here's more from my trip there last weekend...

View larger image

They call it the best-kept secret in Cleveland. If you're on two wheels, you'd call it paradise. Ray's Indoor Mountain Bike Park is a treasure trove of terrain just west of the city's downtown, offering endless lines, jump, log rides and whoop-de-dos for mountain bikers, BMXers and anyone in between.

Riders of all skill levels are welcome in the giant warehouse that grows exponentially by the year. Even if you're just learning to go off-road, there's a room for you.

Active seasonally, the park will be open Oct. 17-May 1. Admission costs $19 on weekdays, $22 on weekends. You can grab a season pass (not out of the question) for $299. They have quality rentals available, like the great single-speed 29er I used for the afternoon. You can also snag a smaller BMX model.

Here's more from my trip there last weekend...

View larger image I started in the beginner's room, a great place to get your bearings. It offers easy log rides, some clean lines and low boardwalks. There's even a ramp that goes into the rafters. Nearly everything in other rooms is offered here in low-key form.

View larger image Like others around the warehouse, this wooden perch leads to many intermediate obstacles. From here, I went around the corner, over some humps and onto a sweet table. One thing you'll notice is that difficulty often comes not from a single feature but in complex lines that require diverse skill sets.

View larger image Ray's is a great place to hone skills needed for Ohio's more advanced trails. Log rides of varying length, height and width wind throughout the building. Believe me: You'll never do them all. It's best to start small and low.

View larger image I didn't hit this part of the park, since I'm by no means an extreme jumper. Kickers, tables and giant launch ramps abound. The feng shui is unique: You'll see the best riders disappear into raised ceiling sections on big jumps.

View larger image One of the coolest features is the foam pit -- ground zero for trying new tricks without breaking bones. You launch from a nice kicker into a giant box of comfy foam pieces. There's a camera on delay that replays your tricks on a small monitor nearby, so you can chart your progress.

View larger image Dudes go big at Ray's, and the ones I met are happy to help you along. Here Nick Yanetta of Strongsville spins a sweet 540 into the pit.

View larger image This wall ride defies gravity and invites bikers to try to reach the top. Several did so.

View larger image The Green Room is the most extreme section at Ray's. The sea of plywood demands precision, expert handling and big air.

View larger image Logan Beyhl, a park manager who also rips, got about five feet out of the final quarterpipe in the Green Room.