The plot may seems as contrived as previous thrill-less thrillers like Enemy of the State, but director D.J. Caruso, who previously led LaBeouf through Disturbia, keeps the action coming.

If every set of twins has one good and one bad one, Jerry Shaw (Shia LaBeouf) has the makings of the evil seed. While his brother Ethan works as an Air Force public relations officer, Jerry is a college dropout working for minimum wage at a copy shop. He scams his friends out of their paychecks and he hasn't seen his brother in three years - until Ethan's funeral, that is.

However, Ethan's possibly traitorous backdoor dealings might be the reason Jerry gets framed as a terrorist. He's saved from a life behind bars by a mysterious voice over the phone tracking his every move. Joined by single mom Rachel (Michelle Monaghan) - another unwitting slave to the voice - Jerry has to complete a series of increasingly dangerous tasks before the voice will set him free.

The plot may seems as contrived as previous thrill-less thrillers like Enemy of the State, but director D.J. Caruso, who previously led LaBeouf through Disturbia, keeps the action coming.

"Eagle Eye"

Opens Friday

Grade: B

While on the run from a group of government agents (among them Rosario Dawson, Ethan Embry and a magnificent Billy Bob Thornton), Jerry and Rachel have to manage a car chase through Chicago, an armored car holdup, an airport gunfight and some B&E in Washington D.C. The film never lets itself get boring.

It does have a few distracting political undertones, and a fear-of-technology aspect is cribbed straight from 2001: A Space Odyssey, but Eagle Eye remains taut, with plenty of entertainment value.