"Changeling" Clint Eastwood turns his deliberate pacing and gorgeously spare cinematography on an extraordinary true story -- the experience of a '20s-era mother (Angelina Jolie) whose son goes missing one day, and who's eventually given the wrong boy back -- and Jolie turns in a fearless performance as a very fearful but resolute parent. Yet by sticking to the known facts of the case, a lot of questions are left unanswered, and you can't help wondering whether a bit of fiction would've been more satisfying. Grade: B+

"Changeling" Clint Eastwood turns his deliberate pacing and gorgeously spare cinematography on an extraordinary true story -- the experience of a '20s-era mother (Angelina Jolie) whose son goes missing one day, and who's eventually given the wrong boy back -- and Jolie turns in a fearless performance as a very fearful but resolute parent. Yet by sticking to the known facts of the case, a lot of questions are left unanswered, and you can't help wondering whether a bit of fiction would've been more satisfying. Grade: B+

"A Girl Cut in Two" With his trademark visual precision, Claude Chabrol offers a fresh tale of murder set apart by confusion over who the victim actually is. Is it a young, vivacious weather girl (Ludivine Sagnier), the older, celebrated author (Francois Berleand) she falls for, or the young, handsome pharmaceuticals heir (Benoit Magimel) who aggressively pursues her? Even after watching the killing, you won't be able to say for sure, but the unexpected path of comeuppance for all three, and Sagnier's perfectly innocent handling of her role, will keep you absorbed. Grade: B+

"Rachel Getting Married" Ditching the standard ways of Hollywood mainstream, director Jonathan Demme adopts handheld camerawork and natural lighting while star Anne Hathaway takes on bad hair and a damaged, ragingly narcissistic character for this intense view of a deep family wound reopened by a weekend wedding. Unwelcome distraction comes from the more exhausting parts of her performance and a forced feeling of multiculturalism throughout. But if you can tune out that loudness, you'll find a touching statement about punishing the ones you love, made in a style that's right for the material. Grade: B

"Religulous" Steered by Borat director Larry Charles, comedian and devout skeptic Bill Maher travels the world speaking to scholars, church leaders and everyday followers, questioning the wisdom of organized religion. Unfortunately, Maher can't cast the first stone in the area of passing judgment, and he blows an opportunity to discuss why so many different cultures develop similar systems of belief. But for fellow skeptics, there's some very funny stuff here, especially Charles' insidious use of film clips and a chat with a real riot of a Vatican official. Grade: B

"RocknRolla" Just in time for his break from Madonna, Guy Ritchie has returned to the winning form of Snatch with another whiplash ride through the London underworld. The convoluted plot this time involves a major heavy with real-estate interests (Tom Wilkinson), the Russian mob, a local gang of working criminals led by Gerard Butler and the Russians' two-timing accountant (Thandie Newton). Sure, it can be tough to keep up with, and it's basically more of the same from Ritchie, but it's also a hoot. Grade: B+

"Sex Drive" This teen comedy following a high-school grad on a long road trip to meet an online crush suggests that today's viewers want a star-crossed journey of love to involve things like public urination and Amish keg parties. In other words, something that makes Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle seem as noble as The Odyssey, which isn't a bad thing here, given the likeable cast and rather hilarious screenwriting. Grade: B

"What Just Happened" Based on a memoir by producer Art Linson, Barry Levinson's new comedy offers a week in the life of an A-list producer (Robert De Niro) deeply embedded in our moviemaking capital and dancing as fast as he can to keep his place there. Mostly it's focused on reining in rogue talent, including Bruce Willis as a bloated, bearded version of himself. Though many moments are funny or hilarious, depending on your movie knowledge, generating the requisite sympathy for De Niro's character is like asking Willis to grow a head of hair. Grade: B-

"Zack and Miri Make a Porno" Kevin Smith's latest is refreshingly simple, a story of two childhood friends (Seth Rogen and Elizabeth Banks) who decide to earn some quick cash by filming their own amateur skin flick. As usual for Smith, it's high on the immaturity, quick with the inappropriate and consistent with the hysterical, but Rogen and Banks really bring this film to life with their natural chemistry. Grade: A-