If you're looking for an HDTV unlike anything your friends are watching - and if the current economic crisis has left you with at least $7,000 in available funds - Mitsubishi now offers the world's first laser TV. The LaserVue model L65-A90 (available for pre-order at Crutchfield.com) is a leading-edge set with a 65-inch DLP screen.

If you're looking for an HDTV unlike anything your friends are watching - and if the current economic crisis has left you with at least $7,000 in available funds - Mitsubishi now offers the world's first laser TV.

The LaserVue model L65-A90 (available for pre-order at Crutchfield.com) is a leading-edge set with a 65-inch DLP screen.

Instead of using a bulb and color wheel to create a picture, this set utilizes a laser-light engine. Three compact lasers - one red, one green and one blue - produce a 1080p picture that's crisper and has two times the color of any TV that's come before it.

According to Crutchfield's product description, "Laser beams are the purest known light source, producing the widest range of colors. In fact, the LaserVue color range measures over 200 percent of the color gamut for broadcast HDTV. You've simply never seen a TV with colors this deeply saturated. And because lasers are a permanent light source, their color accuracy and brightness remain consistent over time - you'll never have to replace a bulb."

If you want to practice a "green" lifestyle, you can be secure in the knowledge that the LaserVue operates at 135 watts and consumes one-third the power of a similarly-sized LCD HDTV and one-quarter the power of a similarly-sized plasma HDTV.

This set measures 58 inches wide, 40 inches tall and only 10 inches deep. It weighs in at a hefty 141.5 pounds. It's one of the new breed of TVs that can display specially created videos or games in 3-D, though you'll have to purchase the necessary 3-D glasses, infrared emitter and PC software.

This set has eight A/V inputs - including composite video, S-video, component video and four for HDMI connections - as well as a USB port for digital photo playback. The TV screen can be viewed from anywhere in a 160-degree angle.

If LaserVue's 65-inch screen is too small for your tastes, a 73-inch screen model is expected by early next year.

Given that Mitsubishi's 73-inch traditional DLP TV is currently on sale at Best Buy for $2,200, the premium you'll pay for a LaserVue is steep. But how do you put a price on a first-of-its-kind gadget?

You don't. You just call Crutchfield and give them your credit card number and shipping address.

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