Long after the campaign is over, political bumper stickers remain. But they don't have to. Perhaps you're feeling melancholy about the McCain/Palin logo on your rear window. Or maybe you're still carrying around a nasty reminder of the Kerry/Edwards ticket. Removing those ill-advised adhesives is easier than you might think. The folks at Liquid Luster Mobile Detailing in Worthington (liquidluster.com) explained how.

Long after the campaign is over, political bumper stickers remain. But they don't have to. Perhaps you're feeling melancholy about the McCain/Palin logo on your rear window. Or maybe you're still carrying around a nasty reminder of the Kerry/Edwards ticket. Removing those ill-advised adhesives is easier than you might think. The folks at Liquid Luster Mobile Detailing in Worthington (liquidluster.com) explained how.

(1) Get a tool to use as leverage to get under the sticker. Avoid sharp objects like a knife or your fingernails, especially if you're removing a sticker from a painted surface. For most surfaces, an old credit card ought to do the trick. A razor blade is OK to use on glass as long as you wet it down first with soapy water or a spray detailer, available at most auto parts stores.

(2) Find a "leading edge" where you can begin to peel up the sticker. A corner is probably your best bet. If part of the sticker won't come off, use your leverage tool to try to start a new edge and keep peeling.

(3) Once you get the main sticker pulled off, use a product called Goof-Off to remove the remaining sticky residue. You can get it at major home-improvement stores like Lowe's or Home Depot. Don't spray it directly on the car; spray it into a microfiber cloth or terry-cloth towel, then wipe that on the surface in a circular motion. (Wax off, if you will.) The Goof-Off will break down whatever remains of the sticker.

(4) Follow up with soapy water or a spray detailer to remove whatever gooey substance is left over. Voila! Your car is as good (and apolitical) as new.