If anyone deserves an encore, it's Patti Smith. An undisputed badass, the living link between the beats and the punks, and the artist who stretched the cultural relevance of each movement further than they could've gone on their own, Smith is the subject of Steven Sebring's documentary Patti Smith: Dream of Life.

If anyone deserves an encore, it's Patti Smith. An undisputed badass, the living link between the beats and the punks, and the artist who stretched the cultural relevance of each movement further than they could've gone on their own, Smith is the subject of Steven Sebring's documentary Patti Smith: Dream of Life.

After giving it too brief a run in September, Landmark's Gateway Theater is bringing the film back for late-night and matinee shows this weekend.

Aside from a basic chronology, Sebring's portrait, shot over 10 years, is relatively light on specifics about Smith's life. It goes for impressions, specific instances and recollections more than facts, like the tambourine that Robert Mapplethorpe gave to her as a birthday gift (a look of true love fills her eyes as she holds it) and the furor she can muster in her political activism.

It's presented mostly in a high-grain black-and-white that captures both her age and her luminosity, and often accompanied by gorgeous and evocative wordsmithing. While it would've been nice to hear more about things like her years of collaboration with late husband Fred "Sonic" Smith, anyone with much love for Patti Smith will treasure this time together.