Back in Y2K, I got free tickets to see Duran Duran at Polaris. I didn't know more than three or four songs by the 1980s megastars. By that point, they were a nostalgia act, and I hadn't spent enough time with the corresponding radio stations to dig much deeper than "Rio" and "Ordinary World."

Back in Y2K, I got free tickets to see Duran Duran at Polaris. I didn't know more than three or four songs by the 1980s megastars. By that point, they were a nostalgia act, and I hadn't spent enough time with the corresponding radio stations to dig much deeper than "Rio" and "Ordinary World."

Still, I knew enough about the band to be shocked when they blew their load by playing their biggest hit, "Hungry Like the Wolf," second. Who does that?

Rock stars with big egos do that. But even more shocking was the way Simon Le Bon and company backed up their ballsy choice, continuing to entertain even after their most powerful weapon had already been deployed.

Would I have paid for the show? No way, but it would have been delightful for a true fan.

That bodes well for Monday's show at the Schott. Sure, the group's ill-fated comeback single, the Timbaland/Timberlake-assisted "Nite Runner," was basically a FutureSex/LoveSounds afterthought. The grind-worthy robot-pop makeover doesn't suit this band.

But if Duran Duran's show is anything like it was eight years ago, the new stuff ought to be nothing more than a slight detour en route to another night of hits. And that's the way it should be. When it comes to this band, I will cry for yesterday, and they probably will deliver.