When Constantines burst out of the tiny college town of Guelph, Ontario, early this decade, their sophisticated workingman's post-punk was billed as one part Fugazi, one part Springsteen.

When Constantines burst out of the tiny college town of Guelph, Ontario, early this decade, their sophisticated workingman's post-punk was billed as one part Fugazi, one part Springsteen.

The band is earnest enough for that, but such a simple breakdown does them a disservice. Four albums in, it's never been clearer that Constantines' sound is their own.

Bryan Webb sings with power and conviction that transcend spot-the-influence games, somehow sounding grizzled and smooth at once. His bandmates pull off the same trick, building dark but accessible tracks that glow faintly, like neon signs caked in dust.

Nothing on the new Kensington Heights hits with the ferocity of older tracks like "Young Offenders" and "Insectivora," but the album is as crafty and engrossing as anything they've released. And if Constantines' set at this year's SXSW is any indication, they'll rock selections old and new Friday at The Summit.