Coffee aficionados insist that brewing coffee with a French press instead of the typical drip method results in a more delicious cup. The process, which dates back to 19th-century Europe, allows extra oils and a few stray grounds into the coffee, resulting in a heartier, richer flavor. I asked Sam Brown at tiny Clintonville coffee house Yeah, Me Too how to work the press to perfection.

Coffee aficionados insist that brewing coffee with a French press instead of the typical drip method results in a more delicious cup. The process, which dates back to 19th-century Europe, allows extra oils and a few stray grounds into the coffee, resulting in a heartier, richer flavor. I asked Sam Brown at tiny Clintonville coffee house Yeah, Me Too how to work the press to perfection.

(1) Get the gear. You need the French press, obviously - the standard is a 32-ounce Bodum brand pot - but to get the full French-press experience, you'll also want to spring for a coffee grinder. According to Brown, it's foolish to even bother with French press unless you use fresh grounds.

(2) Grind a half-cup of whole beans, then dump the grounds into the pot. You want to leave them coarser than you would for a drip machine, so that only a few of the grounds escape through the screen and into your beverage.

(3) Fill the pot with boiling water up to about two inches below the rim. Lay the screen across the top of the pot, then fill the water up the rest of the way, stopping at the base of the pouring spout.

(4) Let the coffee steep for four minutes.

(5) Gently press the screen down through the pot, capturing the grounds and leaving a luscious beverage in their wake. Voila! Your high-class java is ready to enjoy.