Its story is totally preposterous and its adrenalized action scene coverage can start a craving for Dramamine, yet the latest by producer-cowriter Luc Besson (the Transporter films) and director Pierre Morel (District 13) has an unlikely advantage. It's the improbable casting of Liam Neeson - that dignified Irish actor who played Oskar Shindler and Qui-Gon Jinn - in a part that would've once gone to Charles Bronson, maybe Harrison Ford.

Its story is totally preposterous and its adrenalized action scene coverage can start a craving for Dramamine, yet the latest by producer-cowriter Luc Besson (the Transporter films) and director Pierre Morel (District 13) has an unlikely advantage. It's the improbable casting of Liam Neeson - that dignified Irish actor who played Oskar Shindler and Qui-Gon Jinn - in a part that would've once gone to Charles Bronson, maybe Harrison Ford.

A retired government agent who discovers that his teenage daughter (Columbus' own Maggie Grace) has been kidnapped during a Paris vacation by a group of hardcore Albanian sex traffickers, Neeson's Bryan Mills employs his years of training to find her and hunt down her captors before she's never seen again.

Despite the obstacles put in his path by a shady acquaintance in French law enforcement, Mills becomes an unstoppable one-man rampage of hand-to-hand combat, cars used as incendiary devices and shots fired with other men's guns - sometimes with the other men still attached. While this isn't recommended behavior for Americans traveling overseas, it's good fun on screen, and the gravitas Neeson carries with him just amps up the absurdity of it all.