Got a home computer network? If so, you can use it for more than just accessing the internet around your house. Why not display your digital pictures, music and videos from your PC (as well as all sorts of internet content) on the bigger screen of your home TV? You'd be surprised how beautiful the photos and videos will look and the music will sound.

Got a home computer network?

If so, you can use it for more than just accessing the internet around your house. Why not display your digital pictures, music and videos from your PC (as well as all sorts of internet content) on the bigger screen of your home TV? You'd be surprised how beautiful the photos and videos will look and the music will sound.

Kodak, the folks who manufactured the film and cameras your parents and grandparents used on family vacations, has one of the better products for moving your digital memories over a home network.

The Kodak Theatre HD Player ($252 at amazon.com) can connect with your home network either wirelessly or through a wired connection. In addition to shifting where your personal media displays, this unit also has slots to insert memory cards or USB devices to directly view images from your camera or camcorder on your high-def TV set.

Since it also connects to the internet, you can view images from online photo sharing sites such as Flickr or the Kodak Gallery, videos from YouTube, or listen to hundreds of internet radio stations or podcasts. Tons of entertainment - and no monthly subscription fees.

This Kodak gadget is built to share. From the comfort of your couch or recliner, you can e-mail any of the photos you're viewing to friends and family using Kodak's Picture Mail. If you separately purchase Kodak EasyShare Wireless Digital Frames, you can feature your digital photos, videos or slideshows on the walls of your home.

Warning: This is a first-generation product, so they're still working out some bugs.

I've had Kodak's HD Player hooked to my TV for about two weeks. It linked up immediately to my laptop computer, which was in the same room as my HDTV. However, the computer in a family room one floor below my HDTV (of course it's the computer where I store my iTunes music and photos) has proven to be far more of a challenge to connect to the HD Player.

I've been on the phone with Kodak's Help Center for more than a dozen hours (three hours just on Saturday) and the best I can do is get an intermittent connection between that downstairs computer and Kodak's product. The Help Center is having an engineer look into my problem.

Is this unit worth that effort? Only if I can get it working properly.

Got a gadget question or a high-tech toy to recommend? E-mail gspot@columbusalive.com