Candle Lab co-owner Steve Weaver wouldn't let the sun fall on the day his Grandview Avenue shop burned down without searching for a new location.

Candle Lab co-owner Steve Weaver wouldn't let the sun fall on the day his Grandview Avenue shop burned down without searching for a new location.

"Almost the same day as the fire, we started walking around," Weaver said. "We wanted to make sure we opened up back on the avenue. In less than a week from the fire, we had negotiated and signed ... for the perfect spot."

He will open The Candle Lab in a space next to the under-renovation Grandview Theater, hopefully by Valentine's Day - one of the soy candle company's biggest weekends, Weaver said.

The Jan. 17 fire that transformed an entire block of locally owned Grandview shops into an iced-over pile of charred debris didn't take the area's community and camaraderie with it, business owners said.

And while some heard lots of encouraging words and support from customers, others have heard a lot of confused feedback.

Alive caught up with many of the affected business owners to find out what their plans are; calls to the building's landlord, Wagenbrenner Company, were not returned by presstime.

Other devastated retailers include Accent on Nature, which specializes in fossils and jewelry. That business, nearly 20 years old, will continue to sell through its website, where a message says, "As of now the store is closed and will be opening in a new location."

Cheesecake, the women's boutique, was like a child to owners Betsy Johnston and her daughter Ashley Seminari. Now the two are playing the paperwork game, filing information with their insurer.

"I plan to open, but 'when' is the big question," Johnston said. In September, she had closed a second Cheesecake Boutique location in Dublin with plans to open in a larger space this summer. Now, she's not sure what will happen.

"It's hard for a small business," Johnston added. "Everything's gone."

The cause of the fire is still under investigation, but it's said to have started in the shared attic space above the buildings.

That's probably what saved Z Cucina, at the southern end of the block, from being a total loss, too. The restaurant and bar fills what was originally a freestanding post office that was later connected to the retail building by a hallway.

After restoration crews cleaned and sanitized, Z Cucina reopened on Jan. 20. But that doesn't mean owner Rick Ziliak doesn't have any problems.

"I think that there's a pretty big misconception that we burned down," Ziliak said. "I think it's going to take a lot of effort to kind of turn that perception around."

The Italian eatery that opened in 2005 isn't going anywhere. Going forward, though, Ziliak's worried about what will come with the need to rebuild.

"My big concern is this is going to be a long process, and how I'm going to look next to a charred structure for now," he said.