In a recent interview with The Dispatch, Moops bassist Jim Hutter sarcastically proclaimed, "The more you ignore us, the more obnoxious we get!" But a quick spin through the band's new Smells Like the Moops makes me think these guys actually get more obnoxious the more you pay attention.

In a recent interview with The Dispatch, Moops bassist Jim Hutter sarcastically proclaimed, "The more you ignore us, the more obnoxious we get!" But a quick spin through the band's new Smells Like the Moops makes me think these guys actually get more obnoxious the more you pay attention.

Singer-guitarist T.J. Hecker talks a lot of smack, poking fun at jaded hipsters and drunken football couch potatoes alike. But if he can dish it out, hopefully he can take it, too, because I'd rather go back to ignoring this stuff.

The Moops are actually quite competent as musicians. This new record is full of bar-band jams that far exceed the skills of your average happy-hour hacks.

What gets my goat is the persona. I could do without the blunt lyrics and their childish fixation on feces and farts. They insist they don't want to be taken seriously, so maybe I'm being too harsh on some pals having fun in their spare time. But there's just something about this music that irritates me.

On the plus side, The Moops are the rare band that sounds better when they stretch out their songs and jam a bit, as they do ably on "Dead Rabbit." Perhaps next Thursday's show at the Thirsty Ear will afford them the time to rock out to their fullest extent. Maybe, if we're lucky, the guitars will drown out the lyrics.