Next Thursday, Feb. 19, Columbus' eighth Pecha Kucha Night will unfold at Landmark's Gateway Theater. The event also occurs that evening in five other cities, from Detroit to Budapest. Within the following week, Boston and Paris follow suit, and Lima, Peru will jump in with its first edition.

Next Thursday, Feb. 19, Columbus' eighth Pecha Kucha Night will unfold at Landmark's Gateway Theater. The event also occurs that evening in five other cities, from Detroit to Budapest. Within the following week, Boston and Paris follow suit, and Lima, Peru will jump in with its first edition.

Pronounced peh-CHAK-chka (a Japanese word for chit-chat), the event was conceived in Tokyo in 2003 by architects Astrid Klein and Mark Dytham, who sought a new presentation forum for architects and designers. To keep it engaging, a strict format was imposed: a PowerPoint presentation of 20 images for 20 seconds each.

With the format established, the event has spread to 169 cities so far, and expanded to incorporate presentations from all creative types. Lindsay Kenzig, a researcher for an architecture firm, sought out that diversity when launching Pecha Kucha Columbus after hearing about it through colleagues in Seattle.

"There's a purposeful broad spectrum of talent we're trying to present," she said. "You see relationships between things you wouldn't see otherwise."

Past presenters have included architects, animators, community organizers and Lisa Dillman, aka "The Restaurant Widow," who paired discussion with her own food photography.

Volume 8 features 12 presentations, from the photography of CCAD professor Helen Hofelt to ideas for Franklinton's revitalization from city planner Reza Reyazi, to short films by Matt Meindl that have been altered to fit the PowerPoint format.

"It's 20 by 20 - it's just that the images are moving," explained Gateway manager Kevin Ward, another of the five current organizers.

New editions take place about every three months, and the organizers hope to move outside in the warmer months. Anyone with something creative to share is welcome to present on a first-come, first-served basis.

"I think this is a platform that connects people," said fellow organizer and installation artist Sandhya Kochar, who was introduced to Pecha Kucha in her hometown of Bangalore. "It's fun - it's just six minutes and 40 seconds."