How's it shaking, french-fry face? Hey, I can see that "brand-new springtime me" diet plan you talk and talk about isn't quite panning out (think anyone's still listening?). But yeah, you're committed to doing something different very soon. Like what? Buying super-sized britches now that you're stressing the stitches of your "fat pants"?

How's it shaking, french-fry face? Hey, I can see that "brand-new springtime me" diet plan you talk and talk about isn't quite panning out (think anyone's still listening?). But yeah, you're committed to doing something different very soon. Like what? Buying super-sized britches now that you're stressing the stitches of your "fat pants"?

Well, how about taking more control over what goes into your excuse-making mouth by preparing healthy vegetables right at home? That way, you won't have to be in denial about how much oil and cholesterol have gone into your ostensibly good-for-you restaurant food.

OK, maybe it can seem like a horrible chore cooking your own vegetables, what with all the shopping and washing and chopping and slopping; and then you often just wind up with waterlogged, sad-looking clumps of something awful that you do not want to eat. Believe me, I feel that pain.

But I know of a veggie-cooking method that anyone - and yes, that means even stove-challenged people - can succeed at and that yields a great-tasting result. In fact, you only need to figure out three easy things: how to open a bag, roughly hack an onion and turn on an oven.

See, without suggesting you boil anything into a semi-repulsive condition, what this boils down to is I'm recommending you buy convenient bags of already prepped cruciferous vegetables (the ones really good for you) and simply roast the hell out of them with a jumbo-sized sliced onion.

Because what happens when you slowly roast -now don't turn up your nose here - things like broccoli, cauliflower and pre-shredded slaw mixes is that as most of the water cooks out of them, they start to turn attractively brown and eventually end up kind of nutty and kind of sweet as their sugars get released. And that onion has a lot of sugar in it.

Sure, you can save some dough and get fresher flavors by buying whole, unwashed and unbagged vegetables and "processing" them yourself, but maybe the convenience of the bagged stuff will better convince you to eat your healthy veggies. Well, that and the upcoming threat of warm-weather clothing.