In Time Crimes, on a double-bill at the Drexel this week with Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, Spanish writer-director-actor Nacho Vigalondo makes a sharp turn from masked killer territory into a dark, time-traveling thriller. Things keep turning from there, revealing a plot that keeps you guessing to the final shot.

In Time Crimes, on a double-bill at the Drexel this week with Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, Spanish writer-director-actor Nacho Vigalondo makes a sharp turn from masked killer territory into a dark, time-traveling thriller. Things keep turning from there, revealing a plot that keeps you guessing to the final shot.

Happily married Hector (Karra Elejalde) is on vacation with his wife when he's lured into the woods by a young woman who's undressing one minute and unconscious the next. While investigating, he's attacked by a menacing figure in bloodstained bandages.

He finds refuge at a lab facility nearby with a lone technician (Vigalondo) who suggests Hector hide in a strange, fluid-filled contraption, which you just know is a bad idea. A second later, Hector's 90 minutes in the past and he's ignoring the orders of the man who sent him there to stay put.

Hector's frustrating average guy-ness is one refreshing element in Timecrimes' take on this sci-fi subgenre. Another is the growing sense that time travel, and time itself, can be an inescapable trap. Overall, it's a smart, intricate film.