My main telephone is an iPhone, which means I'm a customer - and actually a fan - of AT&T's 3G cell phone service. I also have AT&T as my home broadband internet service. I'd sign up for AT&T's U-Verse television service if they'd ever offer that service to my address.

I have nothing against AT&T.

My main telephone is an iPhone, which means I'm a customer - and actually a fan - of AT&T's 3G cell phone service. I also have AT&T as my home broadband internet service. I'd sign up for AT&T's U-Verse television service if they'd ever offer that service to my address.

That said, I've been ready to dump my landline phone (also AT&T) for quite a while. This past weekend, I finally found the substitute.

MagicJack ($40 for year one and $20 each following year, order at magicjack.com) is a USB plugin for your computer that provides unlimited local and long-distance phone service to the U.S. and Canada over your broadband internet connection.

I don't know of an internet calling program that's cheaper. I've tried Vonage, but it's $30 a month. Forget Time Warner at $50 a month.

Skype offers free calls between Skype customers, but the company charges as much as $96 a year for a phone number and the ability to call out to other landline and cell numbers. Plus, to make the whole thing work, you have to connect some kind of headset/handset to your computer.

MagicJack, on the other hand, is as easy to use as plugging your current phone into the gadget, then plugging the gadget into a USB port on your computer. After the product's software configures itself - in under a minute - you're set to make unlimited calls to any U.S. or Canadian phone number.

With MagicJack, you get a local phone number so people can call you. You also receive free directory assistance, free call waiting, free voice mail and free caller ID. And anywhere you take your computer, as long as it's connected to a broadband internet service, your MagicJack will be there to put through more of those unlimited calls.

I attached my MagicJack to a laptop computer using wireless broadband. I connected the base unit of a wireless phone to that setup. After a day's worth of phoning friends and family on that wireless handset, I never once got a complaint about call quality.

Keep one thing in mind: If you decide to use MagicJack as your home phone, you'll have to keep your computer on 24 hours a day with the MagicJack plugged into your USB port.

If you've been itching to ditch your landline, MagicJack is one easy-to-recommend service.

Got a gadget question or a high-tech toy to recommend? E-mail gspot@columbusalive.com