It's easy to see how a kid growing up in an old folks' home could become obsessed with death. And Edward (Son of Rambow's Bill Milner), whose parents run a retirement home where they care for an annoyingly eccentric bunch of oldsters, is a boy with a one-track mind.

It's easy to see how a kid growing up in an old folks' home could become obsessed with death. And Edward (Son of Rambow's Bill Milner), whose parents run a retirement home where they care for an annoyingly eccentric bunch of oldsters, is a boy with a one-track mind.

By the time he strikes up a friendship with the home's newest resident, aging magician Clarence (Michael Caine), he's wholeheartedly invested in finding out what happens after someone takes their last breath - something he tries to determine scientifically by hiding a tape recorder under the beds of housemates who are on the brink.

Clarence is similarly fixated on his crumbled relationship with now-deceased ex-wife Annie, but that doesn't stop him from (what else?) teaching Edward that there's more to life than death.

Despite its predictability, this quiet British import manages to be eccentric and endearing thanks to engaging performances from a surly Caine and the precocious Milner.