It's one thing to make a movie for stoners, another thing altogether to make a movie that feels like everyone behind the scenes was constantly smoking up. There's a strong whiff of that scenario in Next Day Air, the feature debut of small-screen director Benny Boom and first-time writer Blair Cobbs.

It's one thing to make a movie for stoners, another thing altogether to make a movie that feels like everyone behind the scenes was constantly smoking up. There's a strong whiff of that scenario in Next Day Air, the feature debut of small-screen director Benny Boom and first-time writer Blair Cobbs.

Their ensemble comedy follows slacker deliveryman Leo (Donald Faison) as he responds to his boss/mother's warnings not to screw up again by delivering a box full of cocaine to the wrong address.

As Brody (Mike Epps) and Guch (Wood Harris), the hapless crooks who received the box, set up a deal for its contents with Brody's cousin Shavoo (Omari Hardwick), the dealer it was meant for (Cisco Reyes) desperately tries to find Leo before the Mexican drug lord who sent the box kills him.

The filmmakers crib heavily from the style and tone set by Guy Ritchie in his best works. There are lots of characters and quick cuts, still shots in rapid-fire succession and flashbacks visualized with a hard, washed-out edge. They labor to create a kinetic sense of energy and a balance between the funny and the grisly.

Through comparison, it's easy to see where Boom and Cobbs went wrong, beyond the derivation. Unlike Ritchie's movies, twists are few, energy flags quickly and gallows humor falls flat. From performances to story to Mos Def's two scenes, the whole thing is half-assed.