Most Columbus bands don't throw multimedia cocktail parties to celebrate the completion of their latest records. Some can't afford it. Others might think it too garish. Still others might wonder what's the point?

Most Columbus bands don't throw multimedia cocktail parties to celebrate the completion of their latest records. Some can't afford it. Others might think it too garish. Still others might wonder what's the point?

There are lots of self-conscious reasons not to host such a soiree, but it seemed to work out well last Thursday for Casey and Jesse Cooper, the brothers behind The Receiver's lush, brainy post-rock.

Sure, most of the crowd gathered at 1305 Artists' Grandview headquarters opted to mingle with drinks and hors d'oeuvres rather than attentively examine the duo's sophomore release, Length of Arms, in the adjacent listening room.

But the event built buzz for the record among an influential crowd of friends, musicians and media, sending each guest home with a copy of the record to go with their full stomach and open-bar buzz.

Of course, all this raises questions about how The Receiver conceived of such an event - and how they afforded it.

That's where 1305 Artists comes in. The Receiver hired Fred Blitzer and Jason Clayton's management company last year. They set the band up with a recording studio, video producers, graphic designers and more, all within their big red warehouse in Grandview.

They even hooked the Cooper brothers up with day jobs scanning government documents at the facility. The menial work - which helped to get 1305 off the ground before its various businesses became self-sustaining - also affords the Coopers the flexibility to keep their jobs when they go on tour, and it helped them stay close to the recording process for Length of Arms.

"We could be here during the day, and once we were off the clock, we could dive into doing studio work and doing session work and rehearsing and writing and recording," Jesse Cooper said. "We spend a lot of time in this building."

The hours locked inside 1305 yielded an album as densely layered and carefully considered as debut Decades, but with more variety and vigor. Casey's melodically twisty compositions are still unmistakable, and the duo dives into familiar somnambulant valleys throughout the course of the record.

But they made a concerted effort to rock out more often this time in order to liven up their concerts, a goal they achieved with tracks like the stomping "Castles in the Air" and lead single "Visitor."

"When you're in a bar and there's beer bottles clinking," Jesse said, "you want to be able to play over them."

Their next chance to drown out the background sounds comes Friday at Skully's, where they'll celebrate the album's local release before shopping it around to some national labels. The Receiver is eager to find somebody to distribute their tunes nationally, though they realize they'll still probably have to win their fans one by one through persistent touring.

"We still have stars in our eyes," Casey said, "but we're not as naive as we used to be."

E-mail local music news to Chris DeVille at cdeville@columbusalive.com