In the five years since they opened Bloomsbury Loft, the three owners have turned fabric scraps into bulletin-board covers, old windows into works of art and stray playing cards into gift tags.

In the five years since they opened Bloomsbury Loft, the three owners have turned fabric scraps into bulletin-board covers, old windows into works of art and stray playing cards into gift tags.

And they've turned Bloomsbury Loft into a brand.

The store's rustic-chic style and up-cycling sensibilities have caught on, prompting co-owners Karla Furrer, Judith Mercado and Beth Richman to start sharing their creativity through classes and rentable themed party decor.

Bloomsbury Loft Studio classes are offered periodically in the store. This Saturday, they'll be teaching how to make a circus flag, and Thursday, pillows brought from home will get a makeover with a new designer-fabric covering.

And with the store's Bloomsbury To Go services, hostesses can rent the Bloomsbury style in the form of table decorations and other accents for events.

"People are so excited about some of the things that we make," said Furrer, adding that her co-owners have always been creative. They've taken it to a whole new level since opening the Powell store five years ago, though.

Take, for example, the antique couch with a carved wooden frame that's angled across the front section of the store. The owners reupholstered it themselves in bright pink fabric with black-and-white houndstooth piping and a matching pillow.

"We wanted to find someone to [upholster] it, but we couldn't afford it, so we did it ourselves," Furrer explained. "It turned out to be a fun project, and it's a skill we've used on some other things."

Indeed, furniture and other fixtures given updated looks with fresh coats of paint or new seat covers are for sale and sprinkled throughout the store. The store also specializes in old windows repurposed as frames, with mirror tiles, fabric scraps and antique tins affixed from the back, using the panes as frames.

You won't find two of the same items very often, so grab what you like while you can, Furrer recommended. The inventory is rearranged constantly.

New items - which account for about 20 percent of the merchandise - include recycled rice sack bags and dish towels. There's also Amy Butler fabric, Company C carpeting and Chandler Collection bedding available by special order.

Circling through the store twice is advised to avoid overlooking anything. And although you might have to step over some things at times, this is far from a scattered store of garage-sale finds.

The care is in the details, like with a drawer full of old metal circles bearing individual black letters, the letters "s-p-e-l-l" arranged in front.