Kelly Harvey used to make wine in five-gallon glass jugs in her Worthington home. Now, she makes it in 320-gallon stainless-steel barrels in a Whitehall warehouse.

Kelly Harvey used to make wine in five-gallon glass jugs in her Worthington home. Now, she makes it in 320-gallon stainless-steel barrels in a Whitehall warehouse.

She calls it a hobby that got out of control.

Harvey started Signature Wines in 2004 by building up a supply of five different wines and one port made from grapes trucked in from California each fall. Now, she focuses her time on spreading the word about the custom-label printing service that comes with each bottle.

Besides the volunteers who help crush the grapes in the fall and the freelance designers she uses for label-making, Harvey does it all. And she has another job.

By day (and sometimes public hearings at night and on weekends), she's a community relations liaison for the Ohio Department of Agriculture. Typically, that includes lots of listening to complaints.

"Sometimes I just have to get up and walk around, because hate sticks to you," Harvey said. "It brings you down."

She calls Signature Wines a relaxing release from her daily job, but sometimes - like when she had to drop off two orders before the interview for this story, or when she spends her evenings redoing her website - it's not.

At peak times during the wine's fermentation, Harvey stops by the warehouse both before and after working in Reynoldsburg. She keeps track of things using several planners, and finds her co-workers, many of whom are farmers, to be supportive.

"They have two jobs, too, and this is their busy time - right now they're planting, and in the fall, they're harvesting," Harvey said. "Sometimes there's a sense of camaraderie of being very busy and stressed and tired."

Working out in her home gym, cooking for friends and going to music performances also helps bring her back to reality, Harvey said. And she enjoys wine to unwind, but tries not to take too much advantage of her unlimited supply.

"If you drink too much of your own wine," Harvey said, "then you can't be critical when you're analyzing it."