Eight years after their debut EP sent the emerging internet music culture aflutter and helped launch Brooklyn as this decade's epicenter of hipster cool, the Yeah Yeah Yeahs are finally playing their first show in Columbus.

Eight years after their debut EP sent the emerging internet music culture aflutter and helped launch Brooklyn as this decade's epicenter of hipster cool, the Yeah Yeah Yeahs are finally playing their first show in Columbus.

Originally booked for 1,700-head Newport Music Hall, the gig sold out so fast that promoters moved it to LC Pavilion's 5,000-capacity outdoor amphitheater.

"Whoa," was Brian Chase's reply when he heard the news during a phone interview last week.

In his near-decade drumming for the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Chase has played countless festival gigs, toured the world and performed on Saturday Night Live. But even a relatively minor feat such as the blazing Columbus ticket sales remains a bit of a thrill.

"Each day's just like the first," he said.

Chase grew up in Long Island and attended Oberlin Conservatory of Music before moving back to Brooklyn to form Yeah Yeah Yeahs with college buddy Karen O in 2000. His clever percussion has tended to take a backseat to Nick Zinner's guitar riffs and Karen O's cult of personality, but when your heralded garage-rock group takes a left turn toward dance-friendly New Wave, suddenly the rhythms start to stand out.

That's where the Yeah Yeah Yeahs find themselves with third full-length It's Blitz! After a pit stop at Show Your Bones' pop-rock antics, the group that birthed beer-spewing rocker "Bang" and de facto indie power ballad "Maps" has gone disco, and it feels so good.

"It was definitely a natural process," Chase explained. "We definitely embrace the idea of moving forward and accepting change. But we don't know exactly what form that change will take until we start doing it."

In this case, the end result was a record defined as much by synthesizers as any of the three components that once delivered Yeah Yeah Yeahs' skeletal thump. The opening sequence of "Zero," "Heads Will Roll" and "Soft Shock" shepherds in a new era for the group, though the makeover isn't as extreme as you might think.

The songs set Karen O's usual emotional tropes - sassy, angry, vulnerable - against new framework. But as Chase put it, "all of the music that we did previously kind of comes out in the new direction."

By the time "Dull Life" kicks in, they're back in familiar territory, with Chase holding down the fort for Zinner's rampaging guitar work and Karen O's unhinged raves. The second half returns to keyboard-heavy material like party jam "Dragon Queen" and woozy ballad "Little Shadow."

The way tickets are selling for this show, it's doubtful Columbus fans will care much about the form as long as the Yeah Yeah Yeahs follow through on their usual function. But if for some reason the new sound fails to translate to a rousing rock show, don't be surprised to hear the crowd turning Karen O's chorus against her: "Off with your head!"

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