Of all the tattoo artists we interviewed, Giovani told by far the best story about his ink. So how did he end up with "We the People" on his neck?

Of all the tattoo artists we interviewed, Giovani told by far the best story about his ink. So how did he end up with "We the People" on his neck?

"Just before they caught the highway sniper that was terrorizing Columbus, I happened to be driving home from playing paintball," he explained. "I was completely in camouflage, I was driving the same kind of car that they were looking for, and I just happened to match the description of the guy they were looking for. So I got pulled over, and let's just say I spent a good amount of time trying to prove that I wasn't the highway sniper to the Columbus police."

The next day, Giovani got the Preamble's famous introduction permanently inscribed across the front of his throat.

"It reminds me it's good to have freedom and not be a highway sniper," he cracked.

Giovani has stories for many of his tattoos, but he has almost achieved full coverage from neck to ankles - what's known as a "bodysuit" in tattoo terminology. Unlike some ink aficionados, he has no interest in laser removal to clear up new space; his existing tats mean too much to him.

That's OK. As owner of High Street Tattoo, with locations in the Short North and German Village, Gio is plenty busy tattooing other folks.

His career started 11 years ago, when he got his first gig at Sacred Art in Whitehall after the owner saw some tattoos he did for neighbors. That job didn't last long, but Wes Core from Body Language gave Giovani work so the fledgling artist wouldn't have to go back to being a cook.

"He really refined my tattooing," Gio recalled.

Later, he worked for Durb Morrison at Stained Skin, and when the Hell City founder sold his shops to focus on his festival, Gio saw his chance to jump ship and strike out on his own.

The result: one Columbus' most acclaimed tattoo studios.