During the first few minutes of Goodbye Solo, I was slightly annoyed there weren't subtitles to translate the lead characters' dialogue - African immigrant Solo's animated ramblings and disgruntled Southerner William's gravelly mumbles.

During the first few minutes of Goodbye Solo, I was slightly annoyed there weren't subtitles to translate the lead characters' dialogue - African immigrant Solo's animated ramblings and disgruntled Southerner William's gravelly mumbles.

As it turns out, that was sort of the point. This is a movie about two people who don't understand each other at all.

Solo (Souleymane Sy Savane) is a Senegalese taxi driver who picks up William (Red West), a grizzled old man who looks like he's seen his share of booze and cigarettes. William's headed to the movies, but he offers Solo $1,000 to return in a few weeks and drive him to Blowing Rock, a tourist destination in the Carolina Smokies.

After he susses out that William intends to kill himself by jumping from the peak, Solo quickly forces himself into the man's life to try to get him to change his mind.

Solo's unflappably cheerful, though we soon see there isn't much in his own life to be happy about. His pregnant wife, Quiera (Carmen Leyva), throws him out of the house, he's stuck in a menial, dead-end job and his stepdaughter, Alex (Diana Franco Galindo), shows only slight interest in him.

It'd be easy to say William and Solo develop an improbable friendship, but what they become is more complicated than friends. Reluctant roommates? Unwilling partners in crime? It's hard to be sure, even when you reach the film's flawless final scenes, shot at the gorgeous Blowing Rock.