Derick Martini's Lymelife is littered with the bodies of coming-of-age films that preceded his.

Derick Martini's Lymelife is littered with the bodies of coming-of-age films that preceded his.

There's Alec Baldwin from Outside Providence, Kieran Culkin from Igby Goes Down, his Igby co-star Cynthia Nixon, and Timothy Hutton from Ordinary People. The new film doesn't resemble any of these movies, but the association is inevitable, and the new film isn't flattered by it.

Lymelife is actually closer to American Beauty and The Ice Storm, possessing their suburban locale and two-generational romantic elements, plus the former's sharp hostility and the latter's 1970s setting.

The teen wading through sexual confusion and family dysfunction here is Rory Culkin's Scott. Bullied and crushing painfully on girl-next-door Adrianna (Emma Roberts), he's a late bloomer who's just waking up to the pitfalls of adulthood.

The relationship between his philandering Realtor father (Baldwin) and his enabling mother (Jill Hennessy) bears this out, as do Adrianna's parents - angry, ambitious Nixon and Hutton, a cuckolded victim of Lyme disease.

The film's personal encounters can be as forced as the use of a model of Baldwin's dream housing development to drive home the stale trouble-in-suburbia theme

Despite their baggage of earlier, better films, the cast is what makes Lymelife worth watching. Hutton and the elder Culkin are especially good at finding something fresh in the material. -Melissa Starker