Probably the last thing on your mind in the midst of all the fun of moving - scrounging for boxes, lining up friends to haul your stuff and wondering why you ever thought it was a good idea to buy five years of National Geographic back issues - is being mindful of how your move impacts the environment.

Probably the last thing on your mind in the midst of all the fun of moving - scrounging for boxes, lining up friends to haul your stuff and wondering why you ever thought it was a good idea to buy five years of National Geographic back issues - is being mindful of how your move impacts the environment.

But according to Kim Carlson, a pioneer in the green housing movement, maintaining your commitment to green living doesn't have to end once you've stopped your mail.

Carlson created the EarthSmart Consumer Test - a consumer guide designed to gauge the green-ness of your lifestyle - and she knows a thing or two about the joys of moving.

While the three R's of reducing, re-using and recycling are time-tested favorites, Carlson says people on the move can go a few steps further.

Peanut recall

Although foam peanuts are awesome for buffering breakables, don't be fooled by the fun, fluffy staple of moving.

According to Carlson, "foam peanuts are plastic products made from non-renewable petroleum." Reusing accumulated papers is a more viable alternative.

Paper + scissors = you rock

It may seem counterintuitive to use a virgin material (i.e. trees) for packing, but more often than not, you're probably going to be using recycled paper.

Taking a pair of scissors to previously used papers creates excellent wrapping material for delicates, and it's the gift that keeps on giving. Think beyond your move, and "think packaging for holiday gifts," Carlson said.

Bubble-icious

Bubble wrap is another packaging material of choice, but like foam peanuts, it isn't the best choice.

When concerns about your grandmother's heirloom china threaten to trump the environmental realities of the here-and-now, wrap your head around this: "A good way to keep materials out of the waste stream is to use them as long as possible," Carlson said. "So reusing bubble wrap, and keeping it for the next time you or a friend moves, is also a good option."