Ghostbusters - The Video Game acts as a second sequel to the movie franchise starring Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, Harold Ramis and Ernie Hudson. It's not the first digital version of the series, but it's by far the best.

Games rushed out to tie into a blockbuster movie usually stink. But what if the developers had, say, 20 years to develop a good concept? Would that change things?

Ghostbusters - The Video Game acts as a second sequel to the movie franchise starring Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, Harold Ramis and Ernie Hudson. It's not the first digital version of the series, but it's by far the best.

The dialogue pops thanks to the comedic writing of Aykroyd and Ramis, and familiar characters are brought back to life through the passionate voice work of the film principals. Even Annie Potts and William Atherton reprise their roles as receptionist Janine and EPA tyrant Walter Peck.

The story takes place in 1991 and involves a resurgence of the Ghostbusters' old foil Gozer the Gozerian. Players assume the role of a voiceless trainee Ghostbuster and battle classic foes like Slimer and the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man, who are wreaking havoc in New York.

A lot of elements are borrowed from the two films, but because it's been so long since Ghostbusters was in the public eye, this comes off as more of a tribute than a copy.

Gameplay takes on Grand Theft Auto's behind-the-back perspective, though it does not include an open world. The primary tools of any spook slayer, the proton pack and traps, are adequately represented. Throwing a proton lasso at a ghoul whittles down their psychic energy until they're weak enough to trap.

The game keeps track of the damages as you perform your job testing and upgrading the experimental technology Egon and Ray have designed to entrap the undead.

Ghostbusters features online competitive and cooperative gameplay modes. These modes mirror some typical multiplayer game types, with players working to defend or destroy using their proton weapons or competing to grab the most ghosts and earn the most money.

Keeping the multiplayer limited to four-player matches feels right, since the core Ghostbusters team is also four people strong.

The game's not incredibly long or drawn out, but it does tell a story and will leave fans wanting more. And who knows? Rumors of an actual third movie continue to circulate, and Aykroyd's recently hinted about using this game as part of its backstory. If that happens, would any fan want to be left in the dark by not playing this excellent title?

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