The disaster-themed miniseries is a very specific kind of guilty-pleasure entertainment. It happens to be my favorite kind. And with improbably attractive scientists, terrible child actors and ridiculous dialogue ("We have no other choice, sir. You can't hide from gravity."), Impact delivers.

The disaster-themed miniseries is a very specific kind of guilty-pleasure entertainment. It happens to be my favorite kind. And with improbably attractive scientists, terrible child actors and ridiculous dialogue ("We have no other choice, sir. You can't hide from gravity."), Impact delivers.

After a rogue brown dwarf, or dead star, strikes the moon and embeds itself there, the moon's knocked out of orbit and its mass increases exponentially.

The effects quickly become apparent on Earth. First it's dead cell phones and broken compasses, then it's electromagnetic surges that cause gravity to reverse and people, cars and passenger trains to start floating into the sky. After a surge, everything comes crashing back down - causing the death and destruction you expect from these movies.

But there's an even bigger danger looming. The moon's new orbit and rapidly increasing velocity have put it on a collision course with Earth, and there's only 39 days to stop it. Top scientists - David James Elliot (Jag) and Natasha Henstridge (Eli Stone) play them nicely - come up with a plan to avert the crisis, but the military has an idea of their own.

The miniseries does raise one interesting philosophical question - what happens to the faith-vs.-science debate when the rules of science are upended? - but doesn't have much of interest to say about it.

All in all, it's a fun summer diversion. And who would've thought electromagnetism could make for a compelling plot twist? Thanks, Lost!