As is obvious from the first scene of Away We Go, in which a pregnancy is discovered in a really unusual and intimate way, Burt (John Krasinski) and Verona (Maya Rudolph) don't make up your average movie couple.

As is obvious from the first scene of Away We Go, in which a pregnancy is discovered in a really unusual and intimate way, Burt (John Krasinski) and Verona (Maya Rudolph) don't make up your average movie couple.

They're an about-face for director Sam Mendes from the doomed couple of Revolutionary Road, as well as the best thing going for his new film.

The couple goes off in search of a new place to call home after Burt's parents (Jeff Daniels and Catherine O'Hara) abruptly announce that they're moving to Brussels a month before their grandchild's birth.

As they consider the possibilities in places like Phoenix and Montreal, Mendes and married screenwriters Dave Eggers and Vendela Vida explore ideas about parenting through Burt and Verona's acquaintances in each city.

As the couple travels and worries about their future as a family, Krasinski and Rudolph present a unique, all-too-rare view of stable, happily married partnership. They find an endearing comfort level with dialogue that's genuine and funny in a manner that catches you off guard.

Still, the filmmakers' generosity toward Burt and Verona doesn't extend to everyone in the film.

By comparison, Allison Janney's braying, inappropriate believer in nature over nurture and her opposite, Maggie Gyllenhaal's extreme earth mother, are cartoon characters. They make for some good laughs, but they also pander to a niche, hipster audience almost as blatantly as the new Sandra Bullock movie aims for the masses.