Clintonville's knack for the crafty seems to be contagious. The handmade, DIY vibe coming from shops like Wholly Craft and Sew to Speak has spread to a little section of East Arcadia, where Heavens to Betsy recently opened.

Clintonville's knack for the crafty seems to be contagious.

The handmade, DIY vibe coming from shops like Wholly Craft and Sew to Speak has spread to a little section of East Arcadia, where Heavens to Betsy recently opened.

The small store has a focus on repurposed vintage apparel and other handmade women's clothing and accessories. Owner Lisa Lorraine has been adding her own touches to thrift-store finds for years, and now she's sharing her creations with Columbus, along with the work of other local and national designers.

Although each of Lorraine's dresses and tops features a different vintage garment, there's one thing that unites them all: a decade known as the '80s.

"I love the puffy sleeves, glittery dresses and crazy colors," said Lorraine, who names each of her one-of-a-kind pieces after a different song. "I just try to make the vintage more modern and up-to-speed."

Lorraine used to seek out vintage fashions to create original outfits for appearances as the bassist for now-defunct local rock group The Honeys. She used that edginess again when designing items for the launch of the shop, but plans to take up different themes in her collections.

"I think the store appeals to girls like me who want something different, a little funky and edgy, and to be able to go to a rock show - or be in a rock show - and not see five other girls wearing the same outfit," Lorraine said.

She's paired her collection with similar rocker-looking pieces from Kime Buzzelli, a Columbus native who now lives in L.A. and is working on the wardrobe for 90210, and others.

There's a range of handmade accessories, like toy gun earrings and necklaces by Danielle Petrosa, who puts images of pop icons on Sculpey pendants.

A sharp black chandelier above the accessories stands out against the blank walls - which also host a variety of pieces by Petrosa, including an installation that once hung in L.A.'s Urban Outfitters. Lorraine said she's planning on using some of the boutique's open wall space for art exhibits.

Heavens to Betsy sits across the hall from AmyD - a treasure trove of clothing castoffs given new life in the form of function-forward dresses and aprons - in a former bookstore that's been divided into small storefronts.

"I love the area I am in - it's young and rocker-y," Lorraine said.