Funny People, the new film from Judd Apatow, delivers on its title in spades. On top of a central cast including Adam Sandler, Seth Rogen, Jason Schwartzman, Jonah Hill and Leslie Mann, it's dense with cameos by everyone from Sarah Silverman to Ray Romano. Even Aziz Ansari's bad stand-up comic is funny offstage and James Taylor gets a dick joke of his very own.

Funny People, the new film from Judd Apatow, delivers on its title in spades. On top of a central cast including Adam Sandler, Seth Rogen, Jason Schwartzman, Jonah Hill and Leslie Mann, it's dense with cameos by everyone from Sarah Silverman to Ray Romano. Even Aziz Ansari's bad stand-up comic is funny offstage and James Taylor gets a dick joke of his very own.

Sandler plays George Simmons, a comic whose rise from stand-up to movie star parallels Sandler's own career. George is loved by fans but alone in his mansion, so when he's diagnosed with a fatal blood disease, he hires a young comedian who reveres him, Rogen's Ira, to provide jokes and company.

The prickly relationship many comics have with the world and each other provides room for some hilariously nasty riffs between performers, also a showcase for another exceptional turn from Sandler. George may be likeable, but he's not necessarily a nice guy, and Sandler has an innate facility for his quickly shifting moods.

As a whole, however, there's just too much going on here. A handful of subplots aren't developed strongly enough to warrant their addition to the movie's two-hour-plus running time, and by the time you see a lengthy video of Apatow and Mann's own daughter (playing Mann's daughter) in a school talent show, the filmmaker's ambitions start to feel less inspired and more indulgent.