In the Loop is almost certainly the funniest movie inspired by the Iraq war you'll see this year - maybe the funniest movie you'll see, period. This satire would have both sides of the political spectrum chuckling at the ineptitude of those at the highest reaches of power, assuming they could agree on anything whatsoever.

In the Loop is almost certainly the funniest movie inspired by the Iraq war you'll see this year - maybe the funniest movie you'll see, period. This satire would have both sides of the political spectrum chuckling at the ineptitude of those at the highest reaches of power, assuming they could agree on anything whatsoever.

Loop follows a bumbling British bureaucrat (Tom Hollander) and his eager underling (Chris Addison) as they find themselves in over their political heads in the run-up to a war with an unnamed Middle Eastern country.

It's like what you'd get if you crossed Dr. Strangelove with the original Brit incarnation of The Office and the mockumentaries of Christopher Guest: a swarm of political spin, miscommunication and pointless power jockeying that's absurdly funny, even under the specter of war. The script fires laugh-out-loud dialogue so rapidly, you're sure to miss some brilliant lines.

Director Armando Iannucci - spinning off the film from his BBC series skewering British politics - guides an ensemble that doesn't have an unfunny link. Hollander serves as the film's conscience, but also as an easy target, and James Gandolfini is a scene-stealer (a bit of a distraction, too) as a career U.S. military man.

But the acid-tongued communications director played by Peter Capaldi owns the show. His insulting torrents of profane poetry are endlessly quotable, though they're certainly not printable here.