The world was introduced to Dungen with a tentative drum roll. But within seconds, that gave way to a walloping stomp of power chords, relentless percussion and high-rise harmonies. "Panda," the opening track from 2004's breakout Ta Det Lugnt, positioned the Swedes as a psych-rock powerhouse, fully modern but deeply entrenched in a decades-old tradition.

The world was introduced to Dungen with a tentative drum roll. But within seconds, that gave way to a walloping stomp of power chords, relentless percussion and high-rise harmonies. "Panda," the opening track from 2004's breakout Ta Det Lugnt, positioned the Swedes as a psych-rock powerhouse, fully modern but deeply entrenched in a decades-old tradition.

Two albums later, Dungen is every bit as exciting, but rarely as heavy. On last year's 4, Gustav Ejstes and band have given the piano a more prominent role in their rolling sonic landscapes. They continue to transverse genre and mood with stunning facility, blending and juxtaposing sounds from acid rock to classical pop to jazz fusion with a wonderful aversion to muzak-ready cliche.

They do so with and without Ejstes' multi-tracked yowl. His Swedish-language singing has always been as key to the band's appeal as his compositional mastery, but this time vocals are more of a pleasant surprise than a central focus.

Whether such rich sonic structures can be recreated at The Summit is irrelevant; musicians with this degree of talent and vision are bound to be entrancing and humbling in their rare Ohio performance this weekend.

Indiana buzz band Woods and local instrumental monolith Brainbow will open the show.