Among the most prestigious awards the Greater Columbus Arts Council proffers each year are residencies in Dresden, Germany. The program is open only to artists who've previously won Individual Artists Fellowships from GCAC or made it to the finals for consideration.

Among the most prestigious awards the Greater Columbus Arts Council proffers each year are residencies in Dresden, Germany. The program is open only to artists who've previously won Individual Artists Fellowships from GCAC or made it to the finals for consideration.

Since 1995 less than 30 have been invited, two at a time, to live and work abroad for a number of weeks while German artists do the same here. Notes from Dresden at the Cultural Arts Center presents the art and thoughts of a dozen locals who've made the trip, including Mary Jo Bole and Leni Anderson.

Massillon native Scott Bowe, who's now based in New York, won his residency in 2003. Bowe had had several local shows of his paintings after earning a fine arts degree from Otterbein several years before - vivid, meticulous, text-layered representations of classic film imagery.

"I think the residency's biggest influence on me is how it made me think about home and my relation to it," Bowe explained in an e-mail exchange. One resulting work, created for a group show in Rochester, honed his hometown's obsession with high school football down to a haunting, all-white sculptural miniature of the local team's stadium.

Along with that piece, the short video "Untitled (Psycho)" represents another major shift for the artist, into unfamiliar mediums.

"A residency like that forces you to adapt your studio practice," Bowe recalled. "It's not like you can take your whole studio with you. You don't have the same materials, equipment, influences or stimuli."

Like his earlier work, the video piece appropriates from Alfred Hitchcock, this time Saul Bass' opening-credits sequence for Psycho. Bowe digitally removed the names of cast and crew from Bass' bars of gray on black, then took Bernard Herrmann's all-string score, reversed it and layered it twice over the footage at different speeds. It's an overt representation of the ties that exist between contemporary artists and their forefathers, and its familiar-but-not vibe can be hypnotic.

In addition to Hitchcock's imprint (Bowe admits to having watched the Psycho opening "over and over"), Bowe cited the pop-culture reworks of Paul Pfeiffer and Douglas Gordon. Yet despite their influence and his relative inexperience with video, the artist's previously established approach carries through.

"I've always employed a reductivist method in my studio practice," he explained. "I take an idea and try to strip away anything not essential to it. It's about finding meaning through subtraction and elimination. By altering perspective and perception, my aim is to create a visceral experience for the viewer."