Jamie Foxx's 2005 album Unpredictable sold more than two million copies. He's collaborated with two of hip-hop's top artists - Kanye West on his hit single "Gold Digger" and Twista on "Slow Jamz."

Jamie Foxx's 2005 album Unpredictable sold more than two million copies. He's collaborated with two of hip-hop's top artists - Kanye West on his hit single "Gold Digger" and Twista on "Slow Jamz."

But Foxx believes his current hit single, "Blame It," is the real game-changer for his career.

"Everybody, every artist, looks to try to find that one record that just defines them. And this is really that one record," Foxx said. "We may never get another 'Blame It' record. But this, people will now say, OK, this is legitimate music."

Foxx admits it's still a struggle for him to be taken seriously as a musician. The biggest hurdle is his success in other fields - most notably, acting. Over the past decade, Foxx has cemented his status as a leading man, moving up from impressive supporting turns in films such as Ali and Any Given Sunday to tackle lead roles.

His breakthrough came in 2005, when he portrayed soul legend Ray Charles. Ray earned Foxx an Academy Award for best actor. Since, he's starred in Collateral, Dreamgirls, Miami Vice and The Soloist, garnering rave reviews for his portrayal of a mentally ill cellist.

With "Blame It," Foxx has demonstrated a new level of musical versatility. He earned credentials as a balladeer with Unpredictable, but with 2008's Intuition he wanted to show he could do up-tempo material.

Several tracks pump up the energy - in addition to "Blame It," there's "Just Like Me" and "I Don't Need It." Intuition also features a few ballads, including the pleading "Why" and the simmering "Slow," along with guest spots from the likes of T.I., Lil Wayne, Ne-Yo, Fabolous and T-Pain.

"When you think about it, traditional R&B is really on life support. So for me to do a traditional R&B album, I may have been stuck in the mud," Foxx said.

"But if you're able to transition with a song like 'Blame It,' you're going to be able to sustain. ... It's a younger record, a younger demographic. You have kids just out of high school singing 'Blame It.' For a cat who's been in this game for a minute, that's a whole different audience."

If the new album doesn't establish Foxx as a serious musician, he's hoping his current cross-country trek will do the trick.

"This will be my defining tour," Foxx said. "I'm going to hit 50 cities. I'm going to get on a bus and I'm going to go to every city and I'm going to ... take the time out to really establish myself musically. And hopefully the next two years and the next two or three albums that I drop will really solidify it."

Foxx, who also toured following Unpredictable, said that while his shows this time around will be more music-driven, they'll continue to mix in a bit of comedy.

"There's got to be comic relief. I mean, there's got to be at least one impersonation of Barack Obama," Foxx said.

"There are too many things I want to do, so we're going to squeeze everything we can into an hour and a half, and we're going to make it tight. It's going to keep moving. The music is going to move. And luckily, this time we get a chance to go out when the music is really hot."