Buying local might be new to some. Stopping by farmers markets, recognizing locally made merchandise and supporting a neighbor's new business has been eye-opening for the uninitiated.

Buying local might be new to some. Stopping by farmers markets, recognizing locally made merchandise and supporting a neighbor's new business has been eye-opening for the uninitiated.

But at Helen Winnemore Craft, that's what it's always been about.

"It's interesting to see something that I've loved for so long and done for a long time, to see this cultural awakening," owner Sarah Kellenberger Harpham said. "People are saying, 'Oh wow, the artists, and the markets, and the ...!' It's great."

The German Village shop dates back to 1938 and offers handmade functional and giftable items like pottery, jewelry, decorations for the home and kids' toys.

And despite the movement toward American-made goods, her staff still has to bridge the gap with a bit of education.

People might recoil a bit at the price of a mug, for example, but Kellenberger Harpham knows the potter designs and throws each piece instead of hiring someone else to make them, as some artists do. Her staff shares stories like these with shoppers.

Before Kellenberger Harpham bought the shop 12 years ago, she was a longtime customer who visited regularly as a young girl. She continues many of the traditions started by the store's namesake, Helen Winnemore, like serving coffee or tea to customers.

The store is best known for its jewelry selection, which is displayed in the center room. Most is hidden in the 40-plus drawers set against one wall, offering shoppers the chance to "discover" and be surprised by the different jewelry lines housed in each one.

"Go through all the drawers" is a custom Winnemore began.

"She ran this little place out of her home at first - she called it The Afternoon Shop - and she would just have things displayed in her own furniture, like if she had a chest of drawers that was empty," Kellenberger Harpham explained.

Tucked in other rooms around the shop - housed in a two-story former doctor's office - are glass vases in rainbow colors, pewter baby spoons, tote bags, stationery, and kids' dolls and cars (although most of the toys are made overseas).

Above all, the staff tries to teach people that even everyday items are worth savoring, Kellenberger Harpham said.

"Art can be a part of everyday life," she said. "You don't have to have an ordinary mug; it can be your favorite Saturday mug."