There's something not quite right about the screen adaptation of Audrey Niffenegger's bestseller by German director-for-hire Robert Schwentke (Flightplan) and screenwriter Bruce Joel Rubin (Ghost), and the fact that the time-traveling romantic drama makes less sense the more you think about it only accounts for part of that feeling.

There's something not quite right about the screen adaptation of Audrey Niffenegger's bestseller by German director-for-hire Robert Schwentke (Flightplan) and screenwriter Bruce Joel Rubin (Ghost), and the fact that the time-traveling romantic drama makes less sense the more you think about it only accounts for part of that feeling.

The tale of Clare (Brooklynn Proulx as a child, Rachel McAdams as an adult) and her lifelong love for Henry (Eric Bana), a man who's uncontrollably traveled back and forth through time since childhood, also involves situations that border on uncomfortable.

One is their initial meeting, when Clare is six and Henry is a 38-year-old stranger, naked in her family's bushes (in true Terminator fashion, clothes don't travel with him).

On a more basic level, despite some warmth between Bana and McAdams, the couple's romantic chemistry is flattened by Bana's instinct to play Henry as guarded and slightly lost. And a stronger sense of urgency in their time together would've been appropriate, also livelier.