If there's one bastion of the Columbus rock scene where the fiddle never goes out of style, it's Americana. And if there's one violinist that community turns to time and time again, it's Megan Palmer.

If there's one bastion of the Columbus rock scene where the fiddle never goes out of style, it's Americana. And if there's one violinist that community turns to time and time again, it's Megan Palmer.

"I decided at some point that I really loved playing music," Palmer said, "and one morning I woke up and realized I was in, like, five bands."

At this point, it would be a futile task to list all the local musicians Palmer has sat in with. Judging from a warm, playful interview at her Merion Village home, she remains one of this city's busiest musicians, even as she splits time between Columbus and Brooklyn.

Palmer has been industrious with her violin since middle school, when she formed a string quartet and started raking in the cash playing parties and weddings.

"I think I made more money playing music then than I do now," she said, noting that much of her income comes from her day job as a nurse.

Growing up in the Cleveland suburb Parma, Palmer was classically trained but always entertained the idea of playing in a rock band. As a teen, she dabbled in folk, jazz and blues, and eventually fell in with the singer-songwriter crowd when she moved to Columbus to attend Capital University during the mid-'90s.

By the end of the decade, she was playing out regularly with a vast array of collaborators. Through a shared connection, she ended up touring with Canadian singer-songwriter Luther Wright nearly nonstop for two-and-a-half years.

Then Palmer began her best-known projects: fiddling for Jesse Henry's rollicking country-blues rave-up artists The Spikedrivers and performing her own folk balladry with her backing band, the Hopefuls.

All the while, the Rolodex keeps growing, never more so than on ComFest weekend, when Palmer's gig tally sometimes reaches into double digits. (This year she took the stage with Eric Nassau, Jen Miller, Tim Easton, the Wahoos, Barry Chern, Jason Quicksall, the Spikedrivers and the Hopefuls.)

ComFest organizers even let her ride in one of those golf carts to get from stage to stage.

"I decided this year I was only going to play three times, but I ended up playing seven or eight times," Palmer said. "When Tim Easton's like, 'We just got the secret slot on the main stage; can you make it over?,' what are you going to do?"