It's all about the neck at Columbus Haberdashery. Not in a vampire way. In a scarves and neckties way. The Short North shop, which opened last month, focuses on adornments and alterations for men and women.

It's all about the neck at Columbus Haberdashery. Not in a vampire way. In a scarves and neckties way.

The Short North shop, which opened last month, focuses on adornments and alterations for men and women.

A haberdashery, in case you're wondering, is by definition a shop that sells sewing notions, like buttons, ribbons and zippers. The old-school terminology doesn't match up with Columbus Haberdashery's selection, save for the century-old sewing machine in the shop's street-level window.

A main focus is on alterations - owner Jewel Cisse has contracted with a seamstress who provides quick fixes, everything from adjusting a hem to taking in a wedding dress.

And although the seamstress works outside the shop, there's plenty going on inside. Namely, colorful scarves in eye-catching stripes and patterns - including some from Saudi Arabia and India. Most are the light, gauzy fabric perfectly suited to draping, twisting and tucking over tees, shirts and tops.

And Cisse offers just as many options for men, including tons of ties suitable for all sorts of styles. Most are bright or pastel; other collegiate-looking options are ready for fall. Ties can also be altered if necessary and ordered in bulk for events, performances or weddings.

With dress shirts and socks also at the ready, Columbus Haberdashery presents itself as another Short North option for male shoppers. Most of the ties and scarves hang on racks and shelves along the wall.

Cisse is using the space to display some local art, and she also offers handmade knit shawls from local artist Anne Smith. As the seasons change, so will her selection.

"When you go into a scarf place, you just want a little bit of variety," Cisse said.

She became interested in scarves through traveling - she tends to pick up a scarf as a memento, and recently visited France, where she "saw the appreciation for the scarf."

"For other cultures, it's a staple, and we [Americans] are looking at it as a trend," Cisse said. "But it can provide a lot more to you than just fashion, as an accessory."

But as she points out, as a trend, it's a good one.

"I could wear the same outfit every day of the week and change my scarf, and nobody would notice," Cisse said, laughing.