Last spring, Kevin Parzych earned a bachelor's degree in architecture from Ohio State, and this fall he'll start his master's work there in the same field, but he didn't exactly take the summer off.

Last spring, Kevin Parzych earned a bachelor's degree in architecture from Ohio State, and this fall he'll start his master's work there in the same field, but he didn't exactly take the summer off.

As an intern at the Neighborhood Design Center, a Knowlton School of Architecture collaborative that poses new design solutions for old Columbus neighborhoods, he helped coordinate the upcoming exhibition Works by Neighborhood Design Center. As the show will illustrate, he also explored a different way of looking at the make-up of the Short North.

"We were interested in visualizing the demographics of the area," Parzych said. "Not just through simple charts and graphs, but also looking at things like electronic transactions, social networks - how the digital networks that exist in the neighborhood can be tied to the physical location, and how those different networks manifest themselves within the physical environment."

The presentation will use printed graphics, animations and an installation to map out the ways in which the Short North is engaged on a global scale - for example, the extent of potential electronic imprints created by a dinner table at Marcella's.

On the low-tech side, the show will also offer a series of coloring books, to engage crayon fans of all ages in some of the city's architectural landmarks. Rounding it out are new design models for local, underdeveloped commercial corridors.

As Parzych explained, "We just produce visualizations and say, 'What if?'"