It's nice to know that people are looking out for you. Last week, as I prepared to catch the first public screening in Columbus for All About Steve because the film wasn't shown to critics here, I received several messages from people trying to prepare me for the hell I was in for. The advance word from other cities was harsh.

It's nice to know that people are looking out for you. Last week, as I prepared to catch the first public screening in Columbus for All About Steve because the film wasn't shown to critics here, I received several messages from people trying to prepare me for the hell I was in for. The advance word from other cities was harsh.

Such are the perils of the occupation, though watching the new Sandra Bullock movie certainly beats unemployment or any profession seen on Dirty Jobs. Still, I appreciated the warnings, especially because All About Steve is as bad as early reports suggest.

Bullock's Mary, a crossword puzzle constructor with zero social skills, is at the center of a story that aims for romantic comedy, then for inspirational drama, and misses both. Characters and situations seem randomly patched together from different genre sections in the movie cliche guidebook, an approach worsened by strained, uncomfortable performances from Bullock and co-star Bradley Cooper.

Whenever possible, I'll tip you off to the likes of this and better movies before opening weekend (and in the case of what I'll see and blog about this weekend at the Toronto International Film Festival, way before opening weekend). But you're always welcome to share fair warning, or just your opinion about movies, with an e-mail or online comment.

Read Brad Keefe's opening-day review of "Sorority Row" on Friday.