As expectant parents of a baby girl, Amy and Adam Routh weren't impressed with the run-of-the-mill options they encountered, and Amy guessed others weren't either.

As expectant parents of a baby girl, Amy and Adam Routh weren't impressed with the run-of-the-mill options they encountered, and Amy guessed others weren't either.

She hopes to offer an alternative in Lottie Da, a children's boutique she named after her now 20-month-old daughter, Charlotte. She's filled her store with the kinds of things she wants to see: coordinated crib bedding in unique fabrics, fun and functional diaper bags, back-to-basics wooden toys and cute apparel for newborns to age three.

The Clintonville shop has been open for almost a month now, and the aim is to outfit parents with everything from bags and bibs to nursery decor - with a twist.

"Maybe they appreciate good design or have a sense of style themselves, and once you have a kid, that doesn't mean that all stops," she said.

The selection includes several things Routh, once a designer for Lane Bryant, has created for the shop - like custom-order bedding parents can collaborate on, diaper bags with matching baby slings, and go-anywhere bright blankets with contrast embroidery and trim.

"I just really wanted a creative outlet. I didn't want to go from being a designer to having a business," Routh said. "And when I was searching for designs and products, some of the things that were out there, I thought, were really overpriced."

She also picks out fabric and sketches patterns for mod-inspired girls' dresses and bloomers with ruffle-covered bums, which hang alongside handmade (although not by her) tutu dresses that have been flying off the shelf.

And although she hasn't designed for boys yet, they aren't overlooked.

"I made a special effort because they get gypped, so I've got some hipster-looking stuff," said Routh, pointing to a popular shirt bearing the image of a camera, miniature fedoras and dark-wash, cuffed jeans.

There's also several lines from Sweden and the UK, plus diaper bags made from organic fabrics and plate sets made from 100-percent recycled materials. Routh recently started offering registries.

Routh loves retro-vintage and modern designs, and the resulting selection of colorful, iconic patterns and products means there's something to look at everywhere you turn.

"[The fabric is] not always trendy, it's just unique and different," she said. "There are a lot of things you can buy only in the store and nowhere else."