"Oh! We used to dream/ Now we worry about dying!" Coming from burned-out baby boomers, such a line would be a poignant reminder of the bittersweet consequence of getting older. But from the mouths of two guitar-thrashing, drum-smashing twentysomethings from Vancouver, those words sound like the blustery wind under adolescent wings, fluttering haphazardly between agony and ecstasy.

"Oh! We used to dream/ Now we worry about dying!"

Coming from burned-out baby boomers, such a line would be a poignant reminder of the bittersweet consequence of getting older. But from the mouths of two guitar-thrashing, drum-smashing twentysomethings from Vancouver, those words sound like the blustery wind under adolescent wings, fluttering haphazardly between agony and ecstasy.

After all, this is in the context of a song called "Young Hearts Spark Fire," alongside a song called "I Quit Girls" and another one that posits gleefully, "Must get to France/ So we can French kiss some French girls!"

Post-Nothing, the first Japandroids album, is the purest musical distillation of youthful exuberance you'll hear this year. With big, brash power chords, cymbal crashes and roof-raising shouts, Brian King and David Prowse run amok through hormone-charged teenage memories.

The songs are simple, repetitive and absurdly energetic, but Japandroids rarely writhe in the grotesque emotional vomit that often comes with such earnest, angsty outpourings.

Joining them at The Summit will be Mt. St. Helens Vietnam Band, a snaky, inventive rock combo from Seattle. They play smart little rock tunes that swerve from prog to punk without breaking from a pop attitude. Try the spiraling guitars of "Albatross, Albatross, Albatross" and see why these guys are worth showing up early for.