When the Raconteurs came to town last year, we ran a supergroups spectacular in which I somehow concluded Velvet Revolver was better than the Traveling Wilburys. To be frank, both of those bands are pretty mediocre, as are the Raconteurs for that matter

When the Raconteurs came to town last year, we ran a supergroups spectacular in which I somehow concluded Velvet Revolver was better than the Traveling Wilburys. To be frank, both of those bands are pretty mediocre, as are the Raconteurs for that matter.

The conclusion rings truer than ever: When rock stars recombine into Voltron-like monoliths, the results rarely live up to the hype.

But of all the supergroups that have come and gone over the years, few pack the star power of Them Crooked Vultures, the partnership between Dave Grohl, Josh Homme and John Paul Jones. The trio plays the LC on Tuesday on the fourth date of their inaugural North American tour.

They've been super-secretive about their sound, but clues suggest this band sounds exactly like you'd expect. They've released instrumental snippets that hint at back-to-basics blues rock in the vein of Led Zeppelin. YouTube footage of European festival appearances reveals a distinct Queens of the Stone Age flavor. Perhaps the eventual album will come complete with Foo Fighters studio gloss?

So will this show destroy or annoy? The old saying goes: "The bigger they are, the harder they fall," so let's review the resumes.

Dave Grohl, drums

• Scream (1986-90): Dropped out of high school to join the D.C.-area punk band at age 17 after lying about his age to get an audition

• Nirvana (1990-94): Vicious drumming on Nevermind and In Utero was almost as crucial as Kurt Cobain's songwriting magic

• Foo Fighters (1995-present): After Cobain's death, refashioned himself as an alt-rock frontman with pop chops

• Queens of the Stone Age (2002): Drummed for Homme's band on Songs for the Deaf

The gist: Rock's most acclaimed living drummer and one of its most successful songwriters

Josh Homme, guitar/vocals

• Kyuss (1989-1995): Co-founded one of stoner rock's definitive bands

• Queens of the Stone Age (1997-present): Honed his pop instincts but kept things heavy

• The Desert Sessions (1997-present): Rounds up friends for improv sessions in the California desert

• Eagles of Death Metal (1998-present): Co-founded and sometimes drums for Jesse Hughes' trashy garage troupe

The gist: A cocky rock badass with the skills to back it up

John Paul Jones, bass

•Led Zeppelin (1968-80): After years as a prominent session musician in the British rock scene, held down the low end for one of the greatest rock bands of all time

• Collaborations: Worked with countless musicians over the years, including, per Wikipedia: R.E.M., Heart, Ben E. King, Peter Gabriel, Foo Fighters, Cinderella, The Mission, La Fura dels Baus, Brian Eno, Butthole Surfers and Uncle Earl

The gist: A living legend in every sense

Why Columbus?

Them Crooked Vultures are playing just 10 gigs on their first North American tour, skipping the likes of Chicago, Seattle and Los Angeles. How did Columbus manage to score such a high-profile gig?

"I would love to say it's because Dave Grohl is in love with me," PromoWest spokesperson Amy Cooper said. "But that wouldn't be true."

It's easy to imagine high-powered booking agents submitting bids for the right to host big-time rock stars, and that does happen sometimes, Cooper said. But this one was much easier to secure.

"A lot of it came down to routing," Cooper said. "But to be perfectly honest, it was really the relationship that [PromoWest founder] Scott [Steinecker] and the agent have."

Steinecker, who has been promoting shows in Columbus for decades, has a long-running relationship with the manager for Them Crooked Vultures, who came directly to PromoWest with the offer.

So Columbus rock fans, chalk up this one to friends in high places.